International

International — Drug Control Policies Around The World

Prevalence of Last-Year Illegal Drug Use in England and Wales Among People Aged 16 to 24

"As in previous years, the proportion of young adults aged 16 to 24 taking any drug in the last year was more than double the proportion in the 16 to 59 age group, at 19.2 per cent. This proportion equates to 1.2 million young people. It is this younger age group that largely drives the trend seen in the wider group of adults aged 16 to 59.

Drug Offense Numbers and Trends in Portugal 2012

"In 2012 concerning the administrative sanctions for drug use40, the 18 Commissions for the Dissuasion of Drug Addiction (CDT) based in every capital district of Continental Portugal instated 8,573 processes41, representing the highest value since 2001 and an increase of 24% in comparison to 2011, most of which were, again, referred by the Public Security Police (PSP), National Republican Guard (GNR) and Courts.

Political History of Marijuana Law Reform

Political History of Marijuana Law Reform: "The identification of cannabis as a potentially dangerous psychoactive substance did not, however, prevent a substantial number of these enquiries to explore the issue of whether current legislation reflected the real dangers posed by cannabis. Already in 1944, the La Guardia Committee Report on Marihuana concluded that ‘the practice of smoking marihuana does not lead to addiction in the medical sense of the word’ and that ‘the use of marihuana does not lead to morphine or heroin or cocaine addiction’ (Zimmer and Morgan, 1997).

Money Laundering and Mexican Drug Trafficking Organizations

Money Laundering and Mexican Drug Trafficking Organizations: "Mexico is a major drug producing and transit country. Proceeds from the illicit drug trade leaving the United States are the principal source of funds laundered through the Mexican financial system. Other significant sources of illegal proceeds being laundered include corruption, kidnapping, extortion, piracy, human trafficking, and trafficking in firearms.

Prevalence of Drug Use in France

"Cannabis is still by far the most widely used illicit substance, both among teenagers and the adult population, with 17 million people having already tried it (i.e. 41% of 15 to 64 year-olds). The overall proportion of recent users (in the last month) is 6.6%, and regular use (at least 10 times per month) concerns nearly 1.5 million people in France.

Prevalence of Drugs Other Than Cannabis Among Young People in Belgium

Prevalence of Drugs Other Than Cannabis Among Young People in Belgium: "Results of the VAD school survey 2011-2012 show that the use of illicit psychoactive substances other than cannabis was rather limited in the population of school students (Melis, 2013). In the whole school population, only the older students mentioned ever use of these substances: 4.4% of the 15-16 year old students and 7.7% of the 17-18 year old students. The highest lifetime prevalence among the oldest school students (17-18y) of the Flemish Community were reported for ecstasy (3.8%), hallucinogens (3.5%), amphetamines (3.4%) and cocaine (2.5%). A lifetime prevalence of heroin use was found to be about only 0.4% among the oldest school students (Melis, 2013).

Prevalence of Cannabis Use in Australia

Prevalence of Cannabis Use in Australia: "In 2013, it was estimated that about 6.6 million (or 35%) people aged 14 or older had used cannabis in their lifetime and about 1.9 million (or 10.2%) had used cannabis in the previous 12 months (Online Table 5.4). Around 1 in 5 (21%) people aged 14 or older had been offered or had the opportunity to use cannabis in the previous 12 months (Online Table 5.12), and 1 in 10 (10.2%) reported that they did use cannabis in that time (Online Table 5.7). About 1 in 20 Australians (5.3%) had used in the month prior to the survey and 3.5% had used in the previous week.

Prevalence of Cocaine Use in Australia

Prevalence of Cocaine Use in Australia: "There was a significant increase in the proportion of people who were offered or had the opportunity to use cocaine in 2013 (from 4.4% in 2010 to 5.2%). However, there was no change in the proportion using cocaine in the previous 12 months (2.1%) (online tables 5.3 and 5.12). Recent users also used cocaine less often in 2013, with a lower proportion using it every few months (from 26% to 18.0%) and a higher proportion using it once or twice a year from 61% to 71% (Online Table 5.11).

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