International

International — Drug Control Policies Around The World

Injection Drug Use in Georgia

(Injection Drug Use in Georgia) "There are approximately 40,000 people who inject drugs in Georgia, but only 4,000 of them are covered by harm reduction services. OST [Opiate Substitution Treatment] and NSPs [Needle and Syringe Programs] are largely funded through Global Fund; they cover only a few regions and at best cover up to 10% of people in need78.

Romanian Harm Reduction Programs and Funding Limited

(Romanian Harm Reduction Programs and Funding Limited) "The Romanian drug policy described in the National Anti-drug Strategy 2005-2012 aims to create 'a functional integrated system of institutions and public services which will ensure the reduction of the occurrence and prevalence of drug use in the general population, adequate medical, psychological and social assistance for drug users and streamlined activities for preventing and countering the trafficking and production of illicit drugs and precursors.'73 However, the government’s strategy to reduce

Criminal Penalties for Possession in Ukraine

(Criminal Penalties for Possession in Ukraine) "In September 2010, a new Concept of Drug Policy through 2015 was introduced that does not stipulate any measures for drug treatment. One month later, the government amended the drug laws and criminalized possession of extremely low amounts of narcotic substances—for example, for “acetylated opium” (0.005 grams vs. 0.1 grams in wording previously used), “opium” (0.1 grams vs. 0.5 grams), “acetic anhydride” (2 grams vs. 250 grams), “norefedrine” (0.3 grams vs.

Limited Resources Available for Harm Reduction in Ukraine

(Limited Resources Available for Harm Reduction in Ukraine) "In some places in the region, governments struggling with negative health consequences are introducing harm reduction services with international support and under pressure from civil society and international donors. For example in Ukraine, the country with the highest adult HIV prevalence in all of Europe, total annual HIV/AIDS spending has increased over the past few years, totaling for example $30 million in 2011 compared with $23 million in 200969.

Potential Impact on HIV Transmission in Russia if Opioid Substitution Treatment Were Available

(Potential Impact on HIV Transmission in Russia if Opioid Substitution Treatment Were Available) "A dynamic model of HIV transmission among people who inject drugs in Russia suggests that assuming a baseline HIV prevalence of 15%, increasing coverage of OST from 0% to 25% of all people who inject drugs could decrease HIV incidence by between 44% and 53%108."

Legal and Policy Barriers to Harm Reduction and Disease Prevention Services in Russia

(Legal and Policy Barriers to Harm Reduction and Disease Prevention Services in Russia) "The main reasons cited for restricting the opportunity of drug users to obtain medical and social aid, including prevention services, are the legislative barriers and official policy course that emphasizes reducing supply through law enforcement and reducing demand by promotion of 'healthy lifestyle'. The Strategy of the Anti-Narcotic Policy of the Russian Federation until 202061 and the plan to implement the strategy reaffirmed that approach.

Cost of Prosecuting Drug Offenders in Russia, 2010

(Cost of Prosecuting Drug Offenders in Russia, 2010) "In 2010 alone, the prosecution of drug offenders (for use and supply) cost at least $100 million in Russia. In comparison, under the Budget Law for 2011, HIV prevention programming is to receive less than 3% of the total $640 million to be allocated in 2012 through the Federal Budget Law for HIV, hepatitis B and C, and the government continues to prohibit internationally accepted drug treatment interventions such as OST [Opioid Substitution Treatment].

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