United States

Ineffectiveness of Interdiction Efforts According to US Military Southern Command

(Ineffectiveness of Interdiction Efforts According to US Military Southern Command) "Last year, we had to cancel more than 200 very effective engagement activities in numerous multilateral exercises. Because of asset shortfalls, we’re unable to get after 74 percent of suspected maritime drug trafficking. I simply sit and watch it go by. And, because of service cuts, I don’t expect to get any immediate relief, in terms of assets to work with in this region of the world.

US Surgeon General's Determination of Effectiveness of Syringe Exchange Programs

(US Surgeon General's Determination of Effectiveness of Syringe Exchange Programs) "SSPs [Syringe Service Programs] are widely considered to be an effective way of reducing HIV transmission among individuals who inject illicit drugs and there is ample evidence that SSPs also promote entry and retention into treatment (Hagan, McGough, Thiede, et al., 2000, Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment, 19, 247-252).

Community Epidemiology Working Group Assessment of Non-Prescription Use of Prescription Analgestic in the US, 2012

(Community Epidemiology Working Group Assessment of Non-Prescription Use of Prescription Analgestic in the US, 2012) "Mixed results were noted for prescription opioids, with increases in indicators for prescription opioids as a key finding reported by representatives in two areas—New York City and San Francisco—based on treatment admissions data (primary treatment admissions for opioids/opiates other than heroin increased in 2012 from 2011 in New York City), numbers of prescriptions (the Prescription Drug Monitoring Programs in both New York City and San Francisco

Community Epidemiology Working Group Indicators of Methamphetamine Use in the US

(Community Epidemiology Working Group Indicators of Methamphetamine Use in the US) "Increases in methamphetamine indicators reported in 2012 continued into 2013. These increases reversed a mostly declining trend since 2007. All CEWG area representatives reported increasing, stable, or mixed indicators in 2013, compared with 2012. Twelve of 19 CEWG area representatives reported increasing methamphetamine indicators in the 2013 reporting period; these were Atlanta, Cincinnati, Denver/Colorado, Detroit, Los Angeles, Minneapolis/St. Paul, St.

Community Epidemiology Working Group Assessment of Cocaine Use and Availability in the US, 2013

(Community Epidemiology Working Group Assessment of Cocaine Use and Availability in the US, 2013) "Cocaine continued to be reported as a drug of concern in CEWG areas in all four regions of the United States. The impact of cocaine abuse continued to be reported by area representatives as high in Baltimore/Maryland/Washington, DC; Boston; Chicago; New York City; Philadelphia; and the South Florida/Miami-Dade and Broward Counties area. However, the decline in cocaine indicators reported at recent CEWG meetings continued to be observed by many area representatives.

Causal Links Between Reduced Drug Use And Reduced Recividism Among Drug Court Clients

(Causal Links Between Reduced Drug Use And Reduced Recividism Among Drug Court Clients) "However, one counter-explanation for the seemingly powerful linkage between reduced drug use and reduced criminal behavior is that both outcomes are, essentially, measures of compliance with drug court, probation, or other supervision requirements.

Probability of Re-Offending by Drug Court Clients

(Probability of Re-Offending by Drug Court Clients) "In the first six months of follow up, we found that drug court offenders were significantly less likely than the comparison group to report engaging in any criminal behavior (28 percent vs. 40 percent, p < .05); and drug court offenders averaged significantly fewer total instances of such behavior (12.8 vs. 34.1 criminal acts, p < .001). We detected additional significant differences in the prevalence of drug-related, DWI/DUI, and property-related criminal behavior.

Reductions In Drug Use Among Drug Court Clients at 18 Months

(Reductions In Drug Use Among Drug Court Clients at 18 Months) "As shown in Table 4-3.5, drug court offenders continued to report less drug use than the comparison group in the year prior to the 18-month survey. Drug court offenders had significantly fewer occurrences of any use (56 percent vs. 76 percent, p < .01), serious use (41 percent vs. 58 percent, p < .01), days of use per month (2.1 vs. 4.8, p <.001), and days of serious use per month (1.1 vs. 2.3; p < .001).

Reductions In Drug Use Among Drug Court Clients At 6 Months

(Reductions In Drug Use Among Drug Court Clients At 6 Months) "As shown in Table 4-3.4, offenders in the drug court used drugs significantly less often than did offenders in the comparison group during the initial six-month tracking period. Overall, 40 percent of drug court participants as compared with 55 percent of comparison offenders reported that they had used at least one of the eight measured substances (p < .05). Drug court offenders also averaged fewer days of drug use per month (1.5 vs. 3.7 days; p < .01) and fewer days of serious use per month (1.0 vs.

What Happens To Participants' Criminal Charges After Graduation From Drug Court

(What Happens To Participants' Criminal Charges After Graduation From Drug Court) "In addition, and important to criminal justice stakeholders and participants, themselves, is what happens to a person’s criminal charges after s/he successfully graduates from drug court. Recognizing that some courts may have multiple tracks for drug court participants with perhaps varying kinds of criminal justice outcomes, we asked courts what happens to the criminal charges for the majority of their participants after graduation (see Table 2- 3.33).

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